Healthy rivers and streams are a vital part of our quality of life here in Central Oregon as well as a legacy we leave behind for our children and grandchildren.

The Deschutes River Conservancy is launching a $10 button campaign, providing an easy way for community members to do their part to give back to the river that we all love so much. 

Purchase your button and get great discounts at local businesses. Buttons are on sale through the month of August at Deschutes Brewery Pub and Tasting Room, Visit Bend, Tumalo Creek Kayak and Canoe, FootZone and online at www.deschutesriver.org.

The buttons will also be sold at the DRC Booth at the Bend BrewFest on August 15, 16, & 17, and at the Little Woody on August 30 & 31

According to Bea Armstrong, Director of Development & Communications at the DRC, “The Deschutes River is the lifeblood of this region; it directly supports our quality of life, drives tourism and is vital to the economy.  This is a great way for everyone to get involved to ensure a healthy river for years to come.”  To find out more about the campaign discounts and the Deschutes River Conservancy visit: www.deschutesriver.org.  All proceeds go to support the mission of the DRC to restore streamflow and improve water quality in the Deschutes Basin.  Please do your part and give back to the river you love!

About the Deschutes River Conservancy

The Deschutes River Conservancy (DRC), based in Bend, Oregon, is a 501(c) (3) non-profit organization founded in 1996.  The mission of the DRC is to restore streamflow and improve water quality in the Deschutes Basin. The DRC brings together State, Federal, Tribal, and local government representatives, irrigation districts, individual irrigators and private stakeholders to work toward these goals.  Collaboration and cooperation are essential components of all DRC enterprises and projects.  To date, the DRC’s programs have restored over 200 cubic feet per second (cfs) to the Deschutes River and its tributaries—the equivalent of more than eight Olympic-size swimming pools pouring into our local rivers and streams every hour.