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Forest Service waives day-use fees for Presidents' Day

The USDA Forest Service will waive fees at day-use recreation sites in Oregon and Washington on Monday, Feb. 19 in honor of Presidents’ Day.

“Public lands in the Pacific Northwest offer nearly unlimited opportunities for year-round recreation,” said Jim Peña, Pacific Northwest Regional Forester. “We hope this fee-free day encourages new and repeat visitors to come out and enjoy their national forests.”

This fee waiver includes many picnic areas, boat launches, trailheads, and visitor centers. Concession operations will continue to charge fees unless the permit holder wishes to participate. Fees for camping, cabin rentals, heritage expeditions, or other permits still apply. The fee waiver does not apply to SnoParks although they might be located on national public lands. The SnoPark permit program is sponsored by the States of Oregon and Washington.

The USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Region manages more than 2,400 developed recreation sites, over 24,000 miles of trails, 51 Wild and Scenic Rivers, and two national monuments. No fees are charged at any time on 98 percent of national forests and grasslands, and approximately two-thirds of developed recreation sites in national forests and grasslands can be used for free. To find a recreation site near you, visit our interactive recreation map.

Mark your calendars for the following USDA Forest Service fee-free days in 2018:     

  • June 2, 2018: National Trails Day
  • June 9, 2018: National Get Outdoors Day
  • Sept. 22, 2018: National Public Lands Day
  • Nov. 11 - 12, 2018: Veterans Day Weekend

The Pacific Northwest Region consists of 16 National Forests, 59 District Offices, a National Scenic Area, and a National Grassland comprising 24.7 million acres in Oregon and Washington and employing approximately 3,550 people. To learn more about the USDA Forest Service in the Pacific Northwest, please visit www.fs.usda.gov/r6.


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