BEND, Ore. -

Deschutes County Parole and Probation officials will decide whether a woman in prison for slashing a baby's throat in Idaho can move to a home in Sisters.

Rae Ann Leach spent nearly 15 years at the Pocatello Woman's Correctional Center after she nearly killed a 20-month baby in 1995.

She was paroled last week for medical reasons, but is still in prison while officials complete her parole plan.

Idaho parole officials and the victim's family told NewsChannel 21 that Leach plans on moving to a home she owns in Sisters with her husband.

Deschutes County parole officials said on Wednesday that once Idaho officials complete Leach's parole paperwork, it will go to Salem, then to the county.

It's part of a federal agreement called the Interstate Compact, which requires states to follow identical rules when transferring adult offenders.

Deschutes County Parole and Probation Administrator Tanner Wark said the county recently received a transfer request and investigation report for Leach.      

He said they expect to get her parole order within the next week and make a decision shortly afterward.

Wark said it can be difficult to deny parolees' requests to move to an area where they have family,  as in the case of Leach.

However, he said, every case is different.

"For a high-risk individual, we have our protocol, we're going to knock on the door, we're going to keep in contact," Wark said.

Leach's prison sentence was set to end in June.

Wark said if the county decides to refuse her parole, there's a chance she could eventually move to the area unsupervised after her parole period ends.

"We're looking at four months of supervision that we would have," Wark said. "Can we supervise her and get her a plan in place in that four-month period that's going to be best for the community? Or if we don't accept the case, and than she's here four months later with no supervision."

He said, in most cases, if parole terms are refused, changes to the plan are resubmitted to the Interstate Compact field offices, then go back to county to which the offender wants to move.

NewsChannel 21 also asked Wark if parole officials would contact the neighbors near the Leach residence  or community if her parole plan is accepted. Wark said he wasn't sure at this point, and it would all depend on the terms of her parole.

Wark said the county has the authority to make changes to her parole plan as it sees fit.