TUMALO, Ore. -

More than 300 people packed Chimps Inc.  the chimps sanctuary in Tumalo, to watch Saturday's Oregon-Oregon State Civil War football game.

It's the largest fundraiser of the year for the sanctuary.

The money raised goes to improvements to the sanctuary and helps provide the care the chimps need.

Beavers and Ducks fans got to enjoy the game with some great food, a silent auction and a raffle.

"It's so great," said Allie Morgan, a caregiver at the sanctuary. "It's so fun to see people excited and hear about the chimps, and just to know that there are people in the community that know about us and see what we do every day."

"I think it's great -- it's a really great way to get the community involved," said Rachel Bronstein, another caregiver at the sanctuary. "And it's a good way to combine football and chimps -- and there's not many things that do that.

"And it's a good way to spread awareness and make some money for the chimps as well, which is important for a non-profit sanctuary."

This year marked the 12th year of the event, and some attendees told us it's a family tradition for them.

The community also got a tour of the sanctuary while they were there.

NewsChannel 21 also asked Chimps Inc founder Lesley Day about a new study that shows chimpanzees go through a mid-life crisis similar to humans.

"I really think they do," Day said. "We have our youngsters that play and have fun, and then they get to be 30.

"I mean, here they have been behind bars their whole life, and I don't know if its a true mid-life, but it sounds like they have some scientific research or backing that this might be true. We definitely have some grumpy 30-year-olds."